Dr. Vincent Daniel Anku

Dr. Vincent Daniel Anku

4 properties

Dr. Vincent Daniel Anku is the Founder and Managing Director of Volta Ghana Investment Limited. He graduated from Grinnell College, Iowa USA with majors in Philosophy and Religion. He then graduated from Cornell Medical School, New York City with Doctor of Medicine. He is a diplomat in four medical specialties; American Board of Internal Medicine (Physician Specialist), American Board Certification in Hematology (Blood), American B. C. in Oncology (Cancer) and a Diploma from the London school of Tropical Medicines and Hygiene. He was a chief of medicines for four years and assistant chief of medicine for eight years and section chief of hematology and oncology at South West General Hospital, Cleveland. He founded and became the Director of The Cleveland Cancer Institute in the United States. He has published several scientific papers on the effectiveness of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation particularly in the treatment of squamous cell cancers of the lung and rectal cancers as well as other important tumors. He is the author of three books. He published his first book: “What to Know About the Treatment of Cancer'' in 1984. In 1995, he released his second book, entitled ''health of the nation” to address the crisis of spiraling health care costs in the United States and offer solutions to making health care available at a reasonable cost. In July 1999, he published his most latest book entitled: 'Hope at Last in Cancer Treatment'. He has served on several boards including Board of Directors of Population Action International, Washington, DC, USA, Board of Directors of Ghana Health Foundation, Washington, DC. He was selected as a member of the Cosmos Club in February 2001, cream of iconic individuals with solid contributions to humanity. The Cosmos Club of United States whose membership includes selected Nobel laureates, Supreme Court judges and eminent scholars from all fields. He was also selected by the then Ghana's Ambassador to the United States, H.E Allan Kyeremanten under Ghana Skills Bank Project as the first of 5 featured exceptional Ghanaian professionals in the diaspora. Since 1995, while still in the USA, Dr. Anku started buying Land in Ghana and quickly establish Volta Ghana Investment Limited, one of the leading real estate's companies in Ghana. His main aim was help individuals and companies who are looking for hassle free land for the development of their homes. Dr. Anku is the Chief Executive Officer of the company and for the past 26 years has been instrumental in managing his company to achieve scope and impact. In 2017, Dr. Anku contributed a unique property to a joint venture with a US based company to develop Ayimensah Park, without doubt one of the top most attractive gated communities in Ghana. He has sold lands to many real estate developers and individuals in Pokuase, Spintex, Aburi and many others. Dr. Anku, the CEO supervises the acquisition, marketing and sales functions of the Company. He is a respected business leader with proven experience in driving growth and implementing innovative business strategies. Indeed Dr. Anku is a substantial contributor to the real estate industry in Ghana by leading his company into greater prosperity through the implementation of relevant real estate policies and programs by building strong relationships with customers and stakeholders and making sure genuine lands are available for sale at all times to those who needs them. In 2018, Dr. Anku helped to establish the Precast Wonderwall Company to provide the individuals and companies with contemporary walling around their properties and lands. The purpose for establishing the company was to 'subdue the cancer relating to land disputes' through proper secure walling. Dr. Anku has created jobs directly and indirectly for many people and contributed immensely to the vitality and development of the Ghanaian economy. He is a paragon of a successful real estate businessman in Ghana. People often ask Dr. Vincent Anku “you are one of the top cancer specialists in the USA, why aren't you treating cancer at home?” His simple answer is “I am trying to control a very virulent economic cancer ie cancer of land ownership in Ghana.”

Dr. Leon Sullivan

Dr. Sullivan served the American people as the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in addition to founding the prestigious Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia. As head of Health and Human Services (HHS), Sullivan's responsibility extended to the health and welfare of the country. He battled the tobacco industry and championed victims of AIDS. In 1993, he left his government post and returned to Morehouse School of Medicine as president. Sullivan hosted the public television show “Frontiers of Medicine”. He is the founding president of the Association of Minority Health Professions Schools and is active in numerous other civic organizations.

Susan E. Rice

Susan E. Rice studied at Stanford University. She worked with President Bill Clinton as part of the National Security Council and oversaw African affairs. After receiving her bachelor's degree in history in 1986, Susan Rice went on to attend University of Oxford, England. Here, she earned her M.Phil and D.Phil in international relations, and wrote a dissertation that examined Rhodesia's transition from white rule. Her paper won the Royal Commonwealth Society's Walter Frewen Lord Prize for outstanding research in the field of Commonwealth History, as well as the Chatham House-British International Studies Association Prize for the most distinguished doctoral dissertation in the United Kingdom in the field of International Relations. She became assistant secretary for African affairs in 1997. With her appointment, she became one of the youngest assistant secretaries of state ever. In 2008, she became the senior foreign policy adviser to Barack Obama during his presidential campaign. In January, 2009, she became America's Ambassador to the U.N. Currently, she is the Domestic Policy Council Director in Biden Administration.

C. Payne Lucas

C. Payne Lucas, is the co-founder and longtime president of Africare, a Washington, D.C.- based aid and relief organization focused on Africa's development and policy issues such as programs devoted to nutrition, sanitation, economic development, health care, education and more in some of the neediest countries in the world. Cleotha Payne Lucas is one of 14 children, Lucas grew up in poverty. He earned money as a child by shining shoes and picking cotton. He wrested himself out of that life by focusing on education and earning scholarships. But he had found his calling, one that became clearer to him during his work as field officer in Togo. Lucas rose the ranks of the nascent Peace Corps, working in various positions including regional director for Africa and director of the office of returned volunteers. From there, he helped found Africare in 1971. Africare grew to become the largest African-American nonprofit organization specializing in aid to African countries. Among the first issues Africare took on was easing the drought that destroyed the Sahel, the region south of the Sahara in the 1970s. At the time of Lucas' retirement from the organization's helm in 2002, Africare had directed more than $400 million to 27 countries for famine and drought relief, agriculture, HIV/AIDS prevention and other initiatives. Mr. Lucas, who was Africare's president until he retired in 2002. C. Payne is one of the 5 people who had the most positive impact on my life.

Frederick Caron "Carl" Lewis

Frederick Carlton "Carl" Lewis (born July 1, 1961) is an American former track and field athlete who won nine Olympic gold medals, one Olympic silver medal, and 10 World Championships medals, including eight gold. His career spanned from 1979 to 1996, when he last won an Olympic event. He is one of only three Olympic athletes who won a gold medal in the same individual event in four consecutive Olympic Games. Lewis was a dominant sprinter and long jumper who topped the world rankings in the 100m, 200m and long jump events frequently from 1981 to the early 1990s. He set world records in the 100 m, 4 × 100m and 4 × 200m relays, while his world record in the indoor long jump has stood since 1984. His 65 consecutive victories in the long jump achieved over a span of 10 years is one of the sport's longest undefeated streaks. Over the course of his athletics career, Lewis broke ten seconds for the 100 meters 15 times and 20 seconds for the 200 meters 10 times. Lewis also long jumped over 28 feet 71 times Honors In 1999, Lewis was voted "Sportsman of the Century" by the International Olympic Committee[93] , elected "World Athlete of the Century" by the International Association of Athlete Federations [93] and named "Olympian of the Century" by Sports Illustrated.

Andrew Young

In the decades since Andrew Young helped change the course of history as a leader in the Civil Rights movement, he has built a remarkable legacy as a civic activist, elected official, groundbreaking ambassador, social entrepreneur, and adviser to presidents. Today, he leads the Andrew J. Young Foundation's efforts to develop and support new generations of visionary leaders who will create sustainable global approaches to economic development, poverty alleviation, and the challenge of hunger. He was a key strategist and negotiator during campaigns that led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. In 1972, Young was elected to Congress, becoming the first African-American representative from the Deep South since Reconstruction. He sponsored legislation that established a U.S. Institute for Peace, The African Development Bank and the Chattahoochee River National Park, while negotiating federal funds for MARTA (Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority), the Atlanta highway system and a new international airport for Atlanta. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter appointed Young to serve as the nation's first African-American Ambassador to the United Nations. Young was an architect of the first U.S. Africa policy grounded in human rights rather than simply cold war calculus, and he helped negotiate an end to white-minority rule in Namibia and Zimbabwe. Young was instrumental in the building of modern-day Atlanta. He was elected Mayor in 1981 and re-elected in 1985 with nearly 85 percent of the vote. Hartsfield International Airport, whose development he championed, made it possible for Atlanta to attract 1,100 new businesses, $70 billion in foreign direct investment, and 1 million new jobs to the region during his tenure. It is now the busiest airport in the world. The city hosted the Democratic National Convention in 1988. Young also led the successful effort to bring the 1996 Olympic Games to Atlanta. Young's involvement with Africa has continued in the years since his term as ambassador. President Bill Clinton appointed him founding chair of the Southern African Enterprise Development Fund, and in 1996 he co-founded Good Works International, where for more than 15 years he promoted an approach to sustainable economic development in Africa and the Caribbean grounded in profitability and social responsibility.